High Blood Pressure 2017-11-18T08:33:59+00:00

What Is High Blood Pressure? High blood pressure is also known as hypertension. Blood pressure is the amount of force exerted against the walls of the arteries as blood flows through them.

The heart is a muscle that pumps blood around the body constantly – during every second of our lives. If a person has high blood pressure it means that the walls of the arteries are receiving too much pressure repeatedly – the pressure needs to be chronically elevated for a diagnosis of hypertension to be confirmed. In medicine, chronic means for a sustained period; persistent.

Anyone whose blood pressure is 140/90 mmHg or more for a sustained period is said to have high blood pressure, or hypertension.

In the United States, approximately 85 million people have high blood pressure – about 1 in every 3 adults over 20, according to the American Heart Association. The National Institutes of Health (NIH) estimate that about two-thirds of people over the age of 65 in the U.S. have high blood pressure.

If left untreated or uncontrolled, high blood pressure can cause many health problems. These conditions include heart failure, vision loss, stroke, and kidney disease.

Symptoms of High Blood Pressure:

  • Headache – usually, this will last for several days.
  • Nausea – a sensation of unease and discomfort in the stomach with an urge to vomit.
  • Vomiting – less common than just nausea.
  • Dizziness – Lightheadedness, unsteadiness, and vertigo.
  • Blurred or double vision (diplopia).
  • Epistaxis – nosebleeds.
  • Palpitations – disagreeable sensations of irregular and/or forceful beating of the heart.
  • Dyspnea – breathlessness, shortness of breath.
  • Anybody who experiences these symptoms should see their doctor immediately.

What is Causes High Blood Pressure?

Even though there is no identifiable cause for essential high blood pressure, there is strong evidence linking some risk factors to the likelihood of developing the condition. Most of the causes below are essential high blood pressure risk factors; there are also a couple of secondary high blood pressure examples:

1) Age

The older you are the higher your risk of having high blood pressure.

2) Family history

If you have close family members with hypertension, your chances of developing it are significantly higher. An international scientific study identified eight common genetic differences that may increase the risk of high blood pressure.

3) Temperature

A study that monitored 8,801 participants over the age of 65 found that systolic and diastolic blood pressure values differed significantly across the year and according to the distribution of outdoor temperature. Blood pressure was lower when it got warmer, and rose when it got colder.

4) Ethnic background

Evidence indicates that people with African or South Asian ancestry have a higher risk of developing hypertension, compared to people with predominantly Caucasian or Amerindian (indigenous of the Americas) ancestries.

5) Obesity and overweight

Both overweight and obese people are more likely to develop high blood pressure, compared to people of normal weight.

6) Some aspects of gender

In general, high blood pressure is more common among adult men than adult women. However, after the age of 60 both men and women are equally susceptible.

7) Physical inactivity

Lack of exercise, as well as having a sedentary lifestyle, raises the risk of hypertension.

8) Smoking

Smoking causes the blood vessels to narrow, resulting in higher blood pressure. Smoking also reduces the blood’s oxygen content so the heart has to pump faster in order to compensate, causing a rise in blood pressure.

9) Alcohol intake

People who drink regularly have higher systolic blood pressure than people who do not, according to researchers. They found that systolic blood pressure levels are about 7 mmHg higher in frequent drinkers than in people who do not drink.

10) High salt intake

Researchers reported that societies where people don’t eat much salt have lower blood pressures than places where people eat a lot of salt.

11) High fat diet

Many health professionals say that a diet high in fat leads to a raised high blood pressure risk. However, most dietitians stress that the problem is not how much fat is consumed, but rather what type of fats. Fats sourced from plants such as avocados, nuts, olive oil, and omega oils are good for you. Saturated fats, which are common in animal-sourced foods, as well as trans fats, are bad for you.

12) Mental stress

Various studies have offered compelling evidence that mental stress, especially over the long term, can have a serious impact on blood pressure. One study suggested that the way that air traffic controllers handle stress can affect whether they are at risk of developing high blood pressure later in life.

13) Diabetes

People with diabetes are at a higher risk of developing hypertension. Among patients with type 1 diabetes, high blood sugar is a risk factor for incident hypertension – effective and consistent blood sugar control, with insulin, reduces the long-term risk of developing hypertension.

People with type 2 diabetes are at risk of hypertension due to high blood sugar, as well as other factors, such as overweight and obesity, certain medications, and some cardiovascular diseases.

14) Psoriasis

A study that followed 78,000 women for 14 years found that having psoriasis was linked to a higher risk of developing high blood pressure and diabetes. Psoriasis is an immune system condition that appears on the skin in the form of thick, red scaly patches.

15) Pregnancy

Pregnant women have a higher risk of developing hypertension than women of the same age who are not pregnant. It is the most common medical problem encountered during pregnancy, complicating 2% to 3% of all pregnancies.

Blood Pressure Solutions

Here at Live Longer Medical we take a comprehensive approach to helping you address and alleviate your high blood pressure. Research shows a variety of solutions that we will explore with you here at Live Longer to determine, based on your health and clinical presentation, what will be the most effective strategy for you.  Solutions include:

  • BrainCore Neurofeedback has also been shown to successfully help do to re-regulating the brain’s response and function as blood pressure is controlled by your brain stem.
  • Smoking Cessation
  • Stress reduction/ Counseling
  • Nutrition Programs, Classes and Meal Plans
  • Fitness and lifestyle changes.

Why Live Longer Medical is different…

At our office we address your  health with a comprehensive and personalized approach. We provide you with a plan, a partnership and a promise that will get to the root cause of your problem.

Our approach will thoroughly evaluate the biochemical and lifestyle factors that are connected to proper health and function. By listening to your story and running the right testing we are able to offer you a very unique opportunity to get better. Our goal is to work with you to develop an easy to follow, life-long, strategy that can help you heal and thrive.

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